Episode 365: How to Capture Emotion in Your Clients – Karissa Layne

emotion

Are you able to pull out real, raw emotions from your clients during your sessions?

In episode 365 of the Bokeh Podcast, Karissa Layne shares about the importance of connecting with your clients so they’re comfortable enough to open up around you. Listen in as she walks through the importance touch points from inquiry to the session that allows her to capture her clients on an intimate level.

The Bokeh Podcast is brought to you by Photographer’s Edit: Custom Editing for the Wedding and Portrait Photographer. You can also subscribe to the Bokeh podcast on the Apple podcast app, follow on Spotify, add to your playlist on Stitcher, or listen on Overcast.

Customer Experience: Honest enthusiasm. (2:26)

Brand Position: Capturing your marriage, not just your wedding day and giving you photographs that reflect who you are. (5:35)

Technique for Time: (8:47)
Take 1-2 days off work each week.
Have realistic expectations for what you can get done.

Inspiration: Faith & Family (17:50)

Book Recommendations: (20:28)
Building a Storybrand by Donald Miller – bit.ly/bp-storybrand
Ruthless Elimination of Hurry by John Mark Comer – bit.ly/bp-ruthlesseliminationhurry
Bridgetone Podcast – bridgetown.podbean.com/e/the-ruthless-elimination-of-hurry

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Karissa Layne Photography (@karissalaynephoto) on

Capturing Emotion in Your Clients:
1. Get to know your clients on a personal level either in-person, on a call, or through a questionnaire; also let them get to know you as well.
2. Prompt your couples to take an action, then look for the in between moments.
3. Give them space to connect during your sessions by stepping away from them.
4. Provide constant feedback to your clients for encouragement.
5. Work Quickly, but also slow down. Don’t make awkward moments.

Action Tip: Start by encouraging your couples to walk or run to loosen them up.

Why Movement Works: They’re thinking about what they’re doing, not how they look or the camera.

Links:
karissalaynephoto.com
instagram.com/karissalaynephoto
Anna Anderson’s Brand Position Consultation – bit.ly/bp-345

Episode 364: Posing Flow for Boudoir – Anna Johnson

posing

Do you struggle with creating a seamless experience while posing your boudoir clients?

In episode 364 of the Bokeh Podcast, Anna Johnson of Boudoir Ego walks us through the posing flow she uses to capture a variety of images with a few simple poses. Listen in as she shares some of her favorite tips for delivering the most out of your sessions!

The Bokeh Podcast is brought to you by Photographer’s Edit: Custom Editing for the Wedding and Portrait Photographer. You can also subscribe to the Bokeh podcast on the Apple podcast app, follow on Spotify, add to your playlist on Stitcher, or listen on Overcast.

Customer Experience During COVID-19: Keeping communication open and popping on social media more than normal. (1:21)

Technique for Time: Set a schedule for yourself. (5:29)

Outsourcing/Delegation: Hire a CPA (9:54)

Inspiration: Watching TV (16:25)

Book Recommendations: (23:55)
Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis – bit.ly/bp-washface
Calm the F*** Down by Sarah Knight – amzn.to/bp-calmthefdown

There is Growth in Experience (29:26)

Photographers that Inspire Anna:
jenerations.com
karamariestudios.com

Posing Flow for Boudoir: (33:15)
1. Starting on the bed; laying on back, stomach, side, feet on wall, etc. + a variety of each of these shots.
2. Move them to half on/off the bed (legs off).
3. Move all the way to the ground; back against the bed, then back on the ground.
4. Move over to the window; against the wall on the ground, on knees, standing up.
5. Move to the couch; Start with sitting, then lay down on back, stomach, side, etc, then kneeling on the couch facing the window/light, etc.

Tip for Shooting Boudoir: Capture a variety of angles and shots for each pose you place your subject in.

Tip for Variety: Shoot through objects like plants, glass balls, prisms, etc.

Links
boudoirego.com
instagram.com/boudoirego
Anna’s Bokeh Podcast Snapshot Episode – bit.ly/bp-231

Episode 285: How to Manage Kids During a Portrait Session – Katie Pearson

Kids Portrait Session

Photographing kids can be challenging, especially if you haven’t found the right techniques to manage them during a portrait session!

In episode 285 of the Bokeh Podcast, Katie Pearson shares 10 tips and tricks to handling rambunctious kids during a shoot! Listen in as she shares some of her funniest stories with photographing children and the gear she uses for entertainment!

The Bokeh Podcast is brought to you by Photographer’s Edit: Custom Editing for the Wedding and Portrait Photographer. You can also subscribe to the Bokeh podcast on the Apple podcast app, follow on Spotify, add to your playlist on Stitcher, or listen on Overcast.

Brand Position: My purpose is to capture love, relationships, and milestones in a fun and colorful way. “Let’s go outside and play!” (2:13)

Advice for Photographers: Customer service is a priority. Make sure your clients are happy from beginning to end. (7:18)

Technique for Time: Outsource your editing (9:41)

Book Recommendation:
Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachael Hollis – bit.ly/bp-washface
bokehpodcast.com
creativelive.com

The Gear Bag: A small handbag full of travel items that act as an emergency kit. (17:19)

How Katie Started Photographing Children (19:01)

Crazy Scenarios from Sessions: (22:35)
A Kid & a Rosebush (22:35)
Runaway Child (23:22)

The Gear Bag for Kids: (25:27)
Bubbles
Stickers

Managing Kids During a Portrait Session: (25:27)
1. Carry interactive items in your gear bag like bubbles and stickers. (Ages 2-4)
2. Get shutter huggers for your camera. (Ages 6 months to 1 year)
3. Feather duster for tickling toes.
4. Act silly.
5. Download a fart app.
6. Utilize Youtube for entertainment. (Baby Shark and Cocoa Melon)
7. Have the child use the camera or be the assistant so they feel important.
8. When you initially meet the family, get on the child’s level, introduce yourself, and ask them to play.
9. Have patience and avoid showing frustration.
10. Direct them to jump, twirl, and walk around to make it more playful.

Links
devinereithphotography.com
instagram.com/devinereithphotography

Episode 254: Wedding Party Posing on a Time Crunch – Alina Thomas

Wedding Party Posing with Alina Thomas

Are your wedding days so busy that you find very little time to capture the wedding party photos?

In episode 254 of the Bokeh Podcast, Alina Thomas provides a step-by-step posing workflow to capture a variety of wedding party photos when you’re on a time crunch.

The Bokeh Podcast is brought to you by Photographer’s Edit: Custom Editing for the Wedding and Portrait Photographer. You can also subscribe to the Bokeh podcast on the Apple podcast app, follow on Spotify, add to your playlist on Stitcher, or listen on Overcast.

Technique for Time: Batch working to schedule blog and social media posts. (1:58)

Book Recommendations: Building a Storybrand by Donald Miller –  bit.ly/bp-storybrand (6:48)

Advice for Photographers: Consistency is key to anything you commit to. (9:47)

Brand Position: A wedding photographer for couples who want more than just beautiful pictures, they want a full experience. (14:24)

The Gear Bag: Macro Filters – bit.ly/bp-macrofilter (20:05)

Step-by-Step Wedding Party Posing Flow:
1. Camera – Wedding party lined up on each side of the couple, looking at camera. (28:28)
2. Laugh – Original position, but looking at each other and laughing. (28:54)
3. Cheer – Original position, with couple kissing & wedding party cheering. (29:32)
4. Camera – Have the wedding party move around and pair up, then repeat the first three poses, starting with looking at camera. (29:59)
5. Laugh – New position, but looking at each other and laughing. (29:59)
6. Cheer – New position, with couple kissing & wedding party cheering. (29:59)
7. Silly – Full wedding party making silly faces.
8. Walking – Bride & Groom walking ahead of everyone else, then kissing.
9. Selfie – Have wedding party get together like they’re taking a selfie, but the photographer is shooting it.

Quick Tip: Take a landscape and portrait image for double the images.

Links:
Alinathomas.com
Alinathomas.com/bokeh
instagram.com/alinatthomas
Convertkit.com
Greetabl.com